Spicy Korean Pork & Vegetable Noodle Bowl

Nova_9530April 27, 2016asian stoupThis recipe was inspired by a Trader Joe’s purchase of fully-cooked Korean-inspired spicy pork shoulder. I don’t usually buy their prepared food — mainly, because although I hear it’s good, I enjoy the cooking process. However, this item intrigued me, it was priced right, and I decided to take a chance. It was very well-seasoned and tender — so, once bought and tried, I bought it a second time and made this noodle bowl.

The depth of flavor in this dish belies the quick and easy preparation. Read More

Fish n’ Chips with an Asian Twist | A Creative Cooking Crew Challenge

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Fish n’ Chips is a popular dish on menus all over the world. According to Wikipedia, it was first introduced into Great Britain’s working classes during the 16th century by Jewish refugees from Portugal and Spain who referred to it as ‘pescado frito’ (fried fish).

This month, the Creative Cooking Crew is challenged to reinterpret this iconic dish and make it our own — take it “some place it’s never been before”. Read More

Leftovers: Or How I Turned My Fancy French-Inspired New Year’s Eve Dinner Into a Spicy Asian Fusion Meal

New Year’s Eve was all about indulgences … foie gras with an apple gastrique and chutney, bone marrow, triple créme cheese and baguette rounds that served as the vehicle for all those delectable starters. Then came some shrimp and lentils (for New Year good luck) followed by a main course of cornish hens and black rice. Not just any cornish hens, either. These birds had a little foie gras under the skin and were basted with the fat rendered from the foie. Indulgent!

Though not French, the Chinese black rice was treated with a mirepoix which also included fennel and was mixed with chopped dates and toasted pecans for a little sweet-savory to complement the birds. Side dish: roasted string beans and mushrooms with a little gorgonzola topping. Read More

An Asian-Inspired Dinner Party or Anyone Can Cook Anything!

Yeah, that’s my take on cooking food outside your ethnicity. All it takes is knowing what you like, a few good seasoning agents*, a dash of confidence and access to google for recipes or to answer any last-minute questions. It may not be “authentic”, but it could (should) be tasty.

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